Permaculture Literacy – HHA

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21 Comments

  • Kim Glinka says:

    I’m familiar with some of these case examples, and the ideas broadly. But I found myself newly inspired, and I actually wrote down three quotes said by John D. Lui :

    “You come to places which are massively degraded, and you realize people aren’t thinking about ecological function. We are ignoring the science that we know; and we believe that what’s important is to produce something. But actually, that’s not the most important thing. The most important thing for survival and sustainability for humanity, is that the entire planet is functional. if we understand how the natural evolutionary processes work, and we emulate those, and we don’t disturb those through our behaviors, we can live in the garden of Eden.”

    “The source of wealth is the functional ecosystems. The products and services that we derive from those are derivatives. It’s impossible for the derivatives to be more valuable than the source. and yet in our economy as it stands, the products and services have monetary values. But the source, the functional ecosystems, are zero. SO this cannot be true. It’s false. We’ve created a global economic institution and theory based on a flaw in logic. So if we carry that flaw in logic forward through generations, we compound the mistake.”

    “Money is a belief system. There’s nothing wrong with money. But what is money based on? If it’s based on functional ecosystems, then the future will be beautiful. If money continues to be based on production and consumption of goods and services, we’ll turn everything into a desert. What is the future for our children, and generations to come in the future?”

    YYESSSS TO ALL OF THIS. Perfectly said in words I could not articulate before.

    Reply
  • Khari Jackson says:

    I’m honestly speechless. I’m not even finish watching it. Thanks for sharing, Bret!!

    Reply
  • Laci says:

    After watching this documentary, i watched greening the desert 2, and then a documentary on a man who regenerated a native forest in New Zealand. I’m getting hooked on stories like this, seeing what’s possible. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  • Valeria Rocha says:

    Wow, this documentary is life-changing <3

    Reply
  • Ashley Hall says:

    I really enjoyed this documentary. I have been loving every documentary that has been suggested so far! A couple of questions came up while I was watching it:
    1) they talk a lot about the negative effects of overgrazing. But in the Inhabit documentary, one of the subjects talked about how grazers improved his land…..so is it just a matter of the quantity of grazing? too much is negative, the right amount is positive? Or maybe the timing of when the grazers are introduced?
    2) When I learned about ecosystems in school, it was taught that the desert is its own special ecosystem, with animals and plants that have adapted to its conditions. Is it weird that I feel a little hesitant to destroy that ecosystem in order to create something more green? Or are the deserts that they are talking about, not really desert ecosystems, but brittle/dead land?

    Reply
    • Bret James says:

      Ashley,

      1) YES it is not the animals, or even how many, its TIMING that is the difference between ecosystem restoration and ecosystem destruction. Simple management practices can make a big difference!
      2) Every square inch of the planet is a precious ecosystem and should be kept in tact. However, humans need to eat, so some of an ecosystem has to be altered to feed humans. If we don’t do it ourselves, on a smaller scale on our own land, then it is being done likely in a destructive way elsewhere and add to that the fossil fuel impact of traditional ag. So, its the kind of thing where either way an ecosystem is getting changed BUT when we do it ourselves we have the chance to increase biodiversity and promote health even if flour / fauna of the ecosystem changes. Lastly, as you will learn elsewhere, ecosystems are always trending TOWARDS lush green old growth forest (in geologic time scales), so its actually quite natural (see lesson on ecologic succession).

      Reply
  • Loren Vansant says:

    Great Documentary, but I much prefer the Greening the Desert with Geoff Lawton and find it a little odd that this one documentary seems to completely gloss over that and put forth the idea that they come up with this completely on their own with no acknowledgment to those that came before them – mainly Mollison. So I’m not sure how I feel about that. However, I did find a lot of great information and watching their progress was nice. Maybe I’m old school and just fill that acknowledgment should always be given. Maybe it was and I missed it somehow?

    Reply
    • Loren Vansant says:

      Okay, apparently we had a hiccup in the internet here (feline caused!) that ended the video about 25 min in. I now see where this documentary is interviewing Lawton as well and bringing in the discussion between Liu and Lawton and now I’m very happy. 🙂

      Reply
  • Zach Hunt says:

    Amazing documentary this is my 3rd time watching now.

    Reply
  • Leona Jones says:

    Loved this documentary….thanks for including. Has already given me ideas.

    Reply
  • Sophie Craggs says:

    amazing documentary. crazy to see how in such a short time (3-5) years we can see the benefits. I love how they offer positive solutions rather than focusing on fear mongering. They should show this in schools.

    Reply
  • Lawrence Bermann says:

    This is what I’m looking to get into. Love to figure out how, who to get ahold of, etc…

    Reply
  • Chandra Curry says:

    It’s absolutely astounding that humanity’s economic models place no value on ecosystems, what enables all the wealth.
    I have a question for you Bret regarding flash grazing and your thoughts on that method of land regeneration?

    Reply
    • Bret James says:

      Enter the regenerative economy… 🙂

      YES! It’s not the COW it’s the HOW. Time is the critical component to decertifying or restoring a landscape with grazing animals. See Module 9 for more!

      Reply
      • Chandra says:

        Awesome! I’m really looking forward to that! I live in a region in Southeastern Alberta, Canada called the ‘Special Areas’. The land received this designation after 20-some years of destructive farming practices stripped all the top soil (ca1900-1920). There was also two fires, one in the 20’s, and one the 30’s, that burnt fall through spring charring the entire root systems of the prairie grasses. Killed the land. It’s still very evident to this day. All this to say, people in this region are convinced this land and the natural grasses are not suitable for flash grazing. It’s tough changing the thinking of conventional ranchers/farmers. Glad I’ll be getting more insight with this course!

        Reply
        • Bret James says:

          It does sound like your landscape has become more brittle due to these events, making it a challenge for certain, but as many people have shown its the how not the cow. Timing might be extra critical, and erring on the side of less time even, for you area!

          Reply
  • Jennifer Devries says:

    This documentary lead me to take this course. So amazing !

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  • Rachel Searle says:

    So good!
    I love seeing how these practices are been used on such a large scale and create massive change!

    Reply
  • Lee Raynor says:

    At the end Geoff says that the problem is now beyond just regenerating our land one backyard at a time, it’s a global, large scale problem and we need to take responsibility as a species. And that we are adding 1 billion people to our planet every 12 years blew my mind. Such an inspiring documentary

    Reply
  • susan tupper says:

    loved the documentary.

    Reply

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