Permaculture Literacy – HHA

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16 Comments

  • Heather Aili says:

    Great information here! It took me longer to get through this lesson though because the cliff notes ended about halfway through at types of cover crops.

    Reply
  • Stephen Haley says:

    A gentleman named Dr. Grant Woods has a website and Youtube channel called “Growing Deer.tv. He is very big into No Till food plots for deer. The premise is the same. He plants a cover crop that is commonly surface seeded. Once grown, he uses a “Crimper” to lay the crop flat on the ground. He then comes back with a machine called a “Seed Drill” which uses tubes to push a seed through the cover crop residue and to a proper soil depth. He does’t water and often doesn’t fertilize the crop. The concept can be used for human food crops as well. Dr. Grant just explains it in his videos is a very simple manner.

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  • Stephen Haley says:

    Excellent class Brett.

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  • Diana Furlong says:

    I’m definitely encouraged to investigate cover cropping and compost teas.

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  • Great lesson, with super interesting extra reading!

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  • Adreena Carr says:

    Great lesson! This actually explains a lot about the condition of my first garden bed. I applied a lot of organic matter but also practiced tilling because I thought that was the proper technique to use. Now the soil looks very impacted although things can grow, however the soil itself looks quite dull and sand like .

    Reply
  • Molly Bouffard says:

    I loved this lesson. I”ve been curious about cover crops and had the basic understanding of what they were but this provided a lot more practical knowledge – I’m really excited to try it out!

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  • Shizuka Ushinohama says:

    This was one of my favorite lesson so far!
    Will be coming back to this lesson again.

    Reply
  • Christopher Daniele says:

    do you recommend cutting/terminating the cover crop as recommended by the NRCS? Or growing and leaving as is?

    Reply
    • Bret James says:

      Christoper – I think it depends on the context. In many cases yes. But in some cases, such as using cover crop for multiple seasons in a location I have let it go to seed and replant itself. Still in other situations I have planted IN the cover crop and just let it grow (I grew a bed of onions in cover crop, experimental but worked okay).

      Reply
  • Loren Vansant says:

    I loved this with the great information and the links to gather more information. Thank you for explaining this further as I have been locked into an argument for weeks with my father over grazing animals and their contribution/lack of contribution to the environmental effects. Now that I have a better way of explaining it to him, maybe we can move away from the argument and into an actual discussion with him learning some things.

    Reply
    • Stephen Haley says:

      Check out Joel Salatin on YouTube and book for information on regenerative grazing plans/operations. You Dad will get him.

      Reply
  • Patrick Sant says:

    So good. Brilliant information to get the brain working

    Reply
  • Xochitl Coronado says:

    I needed to hear this! such a great summary of rebuilding soils and the extra resources are amazing!

    Reply
  • Shea Schut says:

    One of my favorite so far. Thanks!

    Reply
  • Jennifer Evers says:

    Great introduction to rebuilding soil!

    Reply

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