Permaculture Literacy – HHA

This lesson is private, please login course to view this content :)

15 Comments

  • Loren Vansant says:

    This was a truly interesting topic and the dip into the urine-recycle is an interesting topic that begs to be explored further.

    Reply
  • Connor DeVane says:

    Happy to hear you talking about urinecycling — my partner’s grandma Anna Edey has been urinecycling in her garden for decades! she wrote it in her book Solviva: How To Grow $500,000 on One Acre and Peace on Earth

    Reply
  • Chandra Curry says:

    I have a question about compost: how do you maximize composting in colder climates? I live in southeast Alberta, Canada. We’re particularly cold here (10 degrees colder than the city of Calgary 3 hours east). We are frozen usually mid October to mid to late March. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Miel Dubielewicz says:

      I would also like to know more about this as well. As I’m in Southeastern BC:)

      Reply
    • Bret James says:

      Composting, in many warmer climates even, takes place during the summer months (even here in CA). Winter times compost piles mostly go dormant, but this also depends on the SIZE of the pile. Huge masses of materials can retain hot temperatures at the core even in the winter, but ultimately, are cooler than during the summer months. So the key is to get your compost piles prepped in late spring so they can compost all summer.

      Reply
  • Tiffani Beckman-McNeil says:

    Testing our soil is a great homework assignment! challenge accepted! šŸ™‚

    Reply
  • susan tupper says:

    are there soil testing kits one could use at home and which do you recommend? There will be no labs easily accessible where I plan to farm…urine use makes sense but the ash problems I did not know about

    Reply
    • Bret James says:

      Susan – the at home kits really don’t tell you much, just some basics like PH, when what you really need to know is nutrients, CEC etc which can only be tested in a lab. BUT you can mail in your soil and get the lab results via email (several places online provide this service such as Peaceful Valley Farm & Garden)

      Reply
    • Loren Vansant says:

      Susan you can contact your local Extension office – all States have them. Just email whichever is closest to you and let them know you would like to find out how to go about having your soil tested. They will send you a form and instructions. For me, in Florida, it costs $50 to do a complete analysis of the soil on my property. They have very easy instructions and are super helpful.

      Reply
  • Rachel Searle says:

    Great video!
    My hubby tends to wee in the garden anyways so now we just need to collect it!

    Reply
    • Bret James says:

      Ha, yes ENCOURAGE him! If you are not collecting it – challenge him to aim away from the plants and hit the soil above the root zone (trust me he’ll love the challenge).

      Reply
  • Jessa Lussier says:

    so is hardwood higher in nutrients because they are more dense, grow slower and have a longer plant cell system?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.