Permaculture Literacy – HHA

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17 Comments

  • Adreena Carr says:

    I really appreciate this lesson. It’s always good to know that there is good forms of carbon that’s needed for all life and how to actually STORE that and help it in the regenerative cycle. Great info!

    Reply
  • Stephen Haley says:

    Brett, are there any references showing that if we implemented some or even all of these techniques what effect would that have on the carbon released by the agro/industrial industries current output? Would it require full implementation worldwide to offset the carbon output. I know every little bit helps, just wondering what percentages come from us in our “normal” lives and what comes from the business down the road.

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    • Jesscy says:

      {HHA Coach} Hey Stephen! There are a lot of different resources you can check out with a google search that talk about how all of our accumulative efforts effect carbon output. You’re right that every little bit helps, and each person/household is different in their footprint. Supporting businesses that are conscious of the effects they have on the earth is always a good way to increase your individual efforts as well! 🙂

      Reply
  • Molly Bouffard says:

    This is a really helpful lesson to put everything else into a simple rule – reduce and store Carbon.

    Reply
  • Laci says:

    It’s always a relief when i come across permaculture practices that i’ve already been doing for years and the additional ideas that i hadn’t thought of. I already buy most things used or look for ways to repurpose things i have into other things that i need. I also seem to be pretty good at finding things free or nearly free. Most people are looking to get rid of things that i am looking for so it usually works out. It never hurts to ask the people around you if they already have things that you’re wanting that they dont want need or use anymore. It usually ends up being a win win.
    Looking into implementing even more ideas from this lesson!

    Reply
  • Loren Vansant says:

    This was very interesting – ways to reduce & store the carbon and then also ways to return it to the soil. I’m looking forward to finding ways to do this on my design and farm.

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    • Loren Vansant says:

      Sorry for the double comment. I commented, then went and got tea. When I got back my comment wasn’t showing – a hiccup on the net here lol Now that I have this second comment, the first one is there too!

      Reply
  • Loren Vansant says:

    Now this is a lot to think on and some wonderful suggestions you have given us in ways to return carbon back to the soil and to reduce & store carbon. I very much enjoyed that you touched on other subjects, gave an example, and left it for us to research on our own. There is so much to take into consideration and I’m looking forward to implementing them on my farm.

    Reply
  • Chandra Curry says:

    Hi Bret, I have a question about what to do with treated wood. I live on my Dad’s cattle ranch and there’s a massive large-sized pile of treated wood here. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Bret James says:

      Are you asking in reference to disposing of it or using it?

      If disposing of it, the treated wood is likely toxic, what I would do is take it to a landfill where it will at least be buried underground.

      Ultimately there isn’t a great answer because there is no “away” when we throw things away, but at least, by being underground the chemicals are not in surface waters and the soil has a chance to mitigate (hopefully) some of the toxicity in the wood.

      Reply
  • Cristina Tébar says:

    Hugelkulture sounds very good, would it work in a Bsk climate with dry hot summers? Or would it loose a lot of water by evaporation?

    Reply
    • Bret James says:

      Christina – Hugelkulture can definitely struggle to retain moisture in very dry climates, with yours being close to that as a semi-arid climate. But in this case I would suggest its worth experimenting and trying. It certainly can’t hurt anything in this case. Start small and trial it in one location and see what results you get.

      Reply
  • Heather Cahill says:

    I got my computer back!!! I’m so happy to get back on track. This is a good topic to restart on. It’s one I find to be extra interesting.

    Reply
  • Teresa Woods says:

    In the previous lesson (3.5) you said you would put a link to purchase a referenced book but the link wasn’t there.

    Reply

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