Permaculture Literacy – HHA

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22 Comments

  • Heather Aili says:

    I would love to share the comparison of the two drawings of a conventional farm versus a permaculture site to others I’ve talked to that simply think I’m getting into gardening or that I want to become a farmer. šŸ˜›

    Reply
  • Anagha Pathare says:

    These Ethics are great foundation for Holistic living.. Simple yet crucial šŸ™‚

    Reply
  • Kelly Clausson says:

    Iā€™m grateful that this is an important foundation of your class.

    Reply
  • JENNY OLSON says:

    Great lesson!

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  • Molly Bouffard says:

    I loved this lesson, the ethics behind permaculture and challenging myself to live a more earth-friendly life are what got me into this!

    Reply
  • Shizuka Ushinohama says:

    I want to make compost at home to be more ethical, but I live in Canada Zone3 where things breaks down slowly.
    What kind of composting method would you recommend?
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Bret James says:

      Hey Shizuka! We talk all about composting in the next Module on Soils – check that out and let me know if there are any questions after watching those lessons šŸ™‚

      Reply
  • Leah Herrera says:

    Hi Bret,
    I make herbal medicine and will often use safflower or sunflower oil to extract the constituents from my herbs. Can the marc be put in the compost? Even though I press most of the oil out, I’m sure there is a little left behind.

    Reply
  • Martha Troutman says:

    Very similar to the concept of sustainability

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  • Angela Martin says:

    This feels like it would be something to revisit often or at least during any planning stages. It can be easy to move to what is easy, instead of what is rite.

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    • Bret James says:

      Absolutely. Beth and myself are discussing a major change on the homestead that could easily lend our to comfort MORE than what might be right and these ethics are very helpful to keep decisions in check and ensure we are staying on the path where every decision only makes for a better future for people and the planet.

      Reply
  • susan tupper says:

    wish governments followed that venn diagram of ethics! It is up to us as individuals to work toward this…I liked (fair share) to be emphasized in the diagram…as opposed to 9care for the future coz some still feel they care for the future by giving to charities while they proceed to use so much more than their fair share and encouraging destructive methods of accumulating more in terms of wealth….

    Reply
  • Mykela Greenwood says:

    I really like the practical application: the mulching myself instead of buying mulch. Of course, I’ve had a hard time mulching myself, it always turns out moldy, but I see the point and that will help me apply the ethics in other situations.

    Reply
    • Bret James says:

      Mykela – Adding some Nitrogen sources to the mulch can help it decompose better and not mold. Are you in a wetter climate? What kind of mulch?

      Reply
    • Saundra Weaver says:

      Llama pellets if you can get a hold of them are high in nitrogen and are not “hot” so you can apply to garden without it burning. At least that is my experience! SO if you can get ahold of Llama pellets from a llama farm, add it to the mulch for the nitrogen source, maybe it won’t mold is my thought.

      Reply
  • Rajdeep Kaur says:

    So inspiring! Will definitely come back again and again to this basic foundation! Wow!

    Reply

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