Permaculture Literacy – HHA

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24 Comments

  • Anagha Pathare says:

    Very inspiring documentaries. Any problem can be solved in a Garden 🙂 It just resonates at so many levels. It is so simple to be happy and healthy.

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  • Khari Jackson says:

    This was really inspiring and encouraged me to envision this practice spreading across the globe and how I could contribute it. This is honestly such a game changer and has forever transformed how I view deserts and growing plants in desert climates.

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  • Alyssa Bulow says:

    It was cool to see the videos! If Geoff Lawton wrote a book or there was a handout about how exactly to make swales this would be even more helpful.

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  • Ashley Moffat says:

    So amazing to see this work going on! This has also given me lots of talking points for my Geography class when we study agriculture… I’d like them to start thinking about the downfalls of our current food production system and the impact it’s having on the planet and be able to see ways other places have addressed such problems. Hopefully I will inspire them to look into permaculture further!

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  • JENNY OLSON says:

    Amazing work! It excites me to see what is possible with our land!

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  • Bill Sabine says:

    This is amazing! Another example this reminds me of is the Aran Islands in County Galway, Ireland. Not hot and arid obviously, but the islands were all limestone, with no naturally occurring soil, so when they first were inhabited the settlers mixed sand and seaweed from the shore to create a planting medium, and used limestone walls to protect the soil they created. This goes back to around 1000 BCE!!! amazing what rad stuff can be done when working with natures own systems!

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  • Nora Martinez says:

    Inspiring!!! is a a great summari

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  • Brian Barnhart says:

    if he is planting nitrogen fixing trees directly into the swale mound and not the slope downhill of it, is stability not an issue?

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    • Brian Barnhart says:

      I will post this in fb and restate it as, what issues in terms of stability are there when planting in the mound part of the swale?

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    • Bret James says:

      Hey Brian,

      There is debate surrounding planting ON or BELOW the swale berm. In my opinion: If the swale is large enough, tree is not huge and the tree does not need to be managed then it is possible to plant on the berm. Soil types is also a component of this equation (sandy soils are less stable).

      But in my experience, trees on the berm are hard to manage and are better planted downslope from the berm. On the berm I prefer small shrubs, grasses, covers, annuals such as cover crops.

      We talk more about all of this is the lessons on swales later on 🙂

      Reply
  • Alexandra Chow says:

    Fantastic project that can not only empower Healthy ecology , food security, but also small business, Women’s self reliance, self identity, knowledge and social issues on small and large scale worldwide.
    So inspiring!!

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  • Lorraine Ciccarelli says:

    I really loved this. So much so it brought tears to my eyes. I cant wait to be able to share this type of knowledge with others and hopefully bring more green to this world

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  • Claire Neale says:

    Totally awe Inspiring! This just highlights how traditional gardening methods fight against nature constantly. This is crazy, as nature obviously knows what she’s doing right?! Feeling inspired now…

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  • Heather Watson says:

    Is there a more in-depth case study with maps/blueprints and detailed information about this project? I’d love to learn more about it. I’ll look up the project itself and see what I find, but if you have recommendations on studying this project in particular, let me know!

    Also sometimes I feel discouraged by how hot our summers can get in Texas and how much we have to water in the summers (even though I do love the heat, myself) but this example really proves to me that if they can make sustainability happen there, then we can absolutely make it happen here in Texas, with far greater ease.

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  • Kevin Kendrick says:

    Nature empowering people to be self-sustaining in a dry arid desert with salty dirt! Permaculture is a Global game changer!

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  • Aislynn Derden says:

    I love watching these videos. It inspires me to know that through diligent planning, education, and the right tools any community can have abundant vegetation and healthy food. I am ready to get my hands dirty!

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  • Josie Andrews says:

    A great example of how using permaculture can trigger successful community engagement by empowering those it impacts to have a say in what happens to their land and community.

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  • Stephanie McFarland says:

    Wet inspiring and uplifting. I hope to see a lot of people around the world benefit from this way. Especially poorer country’s. I would love to visit the desert project to see all the amazing work that’s been done. It’s incredible.

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    • Liana Smith says:

      i saw in one of the videos (i looked at a few on youtube about this project – dont remember if it is from these two here) that they do an air b&b ? so cool!

      Reply
  • Loren Vansant says:

    Thank you for putting these two videos in here about the Greening the Desert Project. It is a nice reminder of the reason for us taking this course, at least for me. It provides the knowledge that not only is there hope to help heal not only our lands, but the whole World IF we can help others understand how, what, and why they need Permaculture.

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  • Angela Martin says:

    it is amazing how many people that this could positively impact!

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  • susan tupper says:

    Great introduction to permaculture! Makes me feel hope to see one can green a dessert and get the young involved.

    Reply
  • Xochitl Coronado says:

    I would love to see this transformation for my own eyes. how beautiful it must be a desert turning green.

    Reply

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