Permaculture Literacy – HHA

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30 Comments

  • Kristy Cooper says:

    Awesome! I am now thinking about all the spots around my house and around all the concrete lol I am surprised, but not surprised, at how much detail there is going into this course with only a few lessons already. Really excited to learn more!

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  • Heather Aili says:

    This makes much more sense to me than what I normally see when driving in the country!

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  • Janese Magana says:

    This video really opened my eyes as far as design and higher yields. I’m loving this course!

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  • Stephen Haley says:

    I knew about edges from hunting and fishing, but had observed that plant diversity and population was naturally increased in these areas as well. Never thought about straight vs curved lines though. I thought it was all aesthetics. Thanks. I just harvested Kale, Lettuce and Brussels Sprout seeds. Once I had enough for my vegetable beds next season, I took the rest of the seed/foliage and chopped and dropped it along the edges in some areas it might do well. We’ll see what happens.

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  • teresa kopaz says:

    In the back of my mind I always knew about edges, but my instinct for my first design for my space (before this program) was to do straight rows. That has all changed. Edges don’t have to be haphazard or overly “random”, they can be planned, symmetrical and organised and still be productive. I can’t wait till the design section and to get started on my slice of paradise.

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  • Khari Jackson says:

    This has opened my eyes to whole new worlds all around me!!!! Spectacular!

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  • Tim Falls says:

    Awesome lesson — such an eye-opening perspective, inspiring ideas, and an accessible concept since edges are happening naturally all around us everywhere. Thanks!

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  • Adreena Carr says:

    I never really thought of edges in this way. The closest inspiration to this method comes from a book called Garden Awakening where many of the garden designs are constructed in a spiral shape. Thus giving meditative space when growing, providing more space for diversity, and create a more harmonic space. Very cool lesson!

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  • Alexandra Pfeiffer says:

    I love this lesson! The forest farm aerial views were so beautiful and inspiring. My idea of what our future farm will look like is changing! I wonder how curved rows will affect how we tend and harvest our crops.

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  • JENNY OLSON says:

    What a difference edges can make! Beautiful to look at, but so much more!

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  • Alexandra Chow says:

    Great info and very logical observation about the wealth of life in Edges. One more edge I thought about is the Flat planting bed vs. a one with an elevation or a Berm. There too more plants can be stacked in height hierarchy to maximize planting density.

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  • Catherine Lawrence says:

    Nothing is left to chance when Nature is design, just love it

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  • Laci says:

    i was very pleased with myself when i realized that i had already been mostly avoiding straight lines and planned on using some of my existing edges. the sunny patch in my yard is near the fence and i had already planned to use the fencing for my vining fruits and veggies. I’ve been looking at my yard and considering what to plant along the south fence, which is under a walnut tree. there’s not mych ground cover there, it’s a lower lying area that floods when we have heavy rains so I’ve been looking into plants that might thrive there especially considering it’s a part of our yard that doesnt seem to get much use. Now im looking for more edges that i hadnt yet noticed or considered to use to our advantage. I hadnt really thought about side walk edges before. It definitely makes me wana look around and see what else i’ve been missing.

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  • CJ Musick says:

    I love the example of the New Forest Farm, it’s amazing. I grew up with conventional farming, but just the introduction to this makes so much more sense and it’s beautiful!

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  • Philippa Leghorn says:

    I always loved curvy gardens. Wow! I feel like I can justify curviness now. It’s so much more beautiful.

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  • Loren Vansant says:

    This has to be one of my favorite lessons – showing us how our desires for straight and orderly is NOT what Nature truly is about or needs. Nature excels at things being able to naturally move about as needed – meanderings. Showing how much more diversity we can allow to grow by breaking out of the box is truly magnificent and I can’t wait to apply this knowledge and share it!

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  • Katie Kennington says:

    I would love to be able to read these lessons as well as listen and see. Took lots of notes on this one. Also to add…kids love to play in edges! It’s a natural gathering place for people and animals and happy plants! Its sad to see most playgrounds on totally flat locations.

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  • Michelle Green says:

    Edges have always been just there…now I can concentrate on their design, change them as i see fit, use them productively and actually understand the whole system.

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  • Martha Troutman says:

    This edges lesson as well as patterns is paving the way to stretch our perceptions when we look at the land. I think that there must be books that could give us more detail to put this to work under varying circumstances…?

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    • Bret James says:

      Martha – it really does stretch the mind as you say. Probably the best book is Bill Mollison’s Designers manual but even better than that is keeping edges in mind when observing sites and learning more concepts in the program. To some extent the more variety of anything the more edges we create!

      Reply
  • Oakley Biesanz says:

    I am so inspired by the large permaculture farm example! I hope you will go into more specifics about this. 🙂

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  • Terry Nguy-Chang says:

    Wow! This lesson is a real eye-opener, and combined with the patterns lesson, I am learning important design concepts (that I never had in my toolbox) in a such a short amount of time. Transformative! It’s like putting on a new pair of eyeglasses and everything just looks clearer.

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  • susan tupper says:

    I’ve always preferred wilder gardens and ones that meandered with twists and turns and not the formal ones so rigid. Never really thought these were edges providing greater biodiversity which is why there was always more to see and discover..I cannot bear a fence bare of creepers and vines

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  • Lee Raynor says:

    This lesson has provided many ‘aha’ moments for me, thank you Bret! As I watched it I was looking out my lounge-room window at the various edges in my yard. When you showed the 4 landscapes and spoke of the many edges that we may not have thought of (like soil and sub-soil) I was nodding my head going ‘of course!’. I studied some basic Traditional Chinese Medicine and Yin/Yang theory some years ago and in that theory they also say that where there is an edge, the balance between yin and yang is most dynamic. For example where the sand (yang) meets the water (yin) there is a build up of energy and the possibility for transformation is the highest.

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  • Mariah Wannberg says:

    This was my favorite lesson so far because of the creativity it encourages in the design and the inspiration it gives me to be free and celebrate and appreciate natures wild beauty! I watch people attempt to organize everything into perfect lines and rows and to be awakened to the teeming life between the lines invites me to begin looking for the patterns and being more open to seeing things I never knew existed. I’m so glad the edge effect concept was introduced early on.

    Reply

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