Permaculture Literacy – HHA

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13 Comments

  • Lawrence Bermann says:

    I think this is a good base so far. I have to think back to before I began studying the various areas I have been interested in prior to this course. Much of it so far is a nice review and seems like it is becoming common knowledge through the new and various other outlets. Still good information.

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  • Lawrence Bermann says:

    As a base knowledge these are good. I have to think back to before I began studying prior to this course. I think most of the information so far is becoming common knowledge. It is good to revisit and take a second look.

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  • Oakley Biesanz says:

    Thank you for this useful info, especially the computer image of CO2. This really helps bring it home that creating even more photosynthesis opportunities and other carbon sequestering techniques like mulching and not tilling on our sites can help this specific problem of too much CO2 (and other greenhouse gasses.) We can be part of the solution! Love it.

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    • Bret James says:

      Very much so! That is why I also prefer to chop and drop or mulch versus doing burn piles (keeps more CO2 in the ground). The ocean is actually a bigger carbon sink than the forests, more on that soon…

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  • Martha Troutman says:

    It proves powerful how our own yard can make a difference– by adding to the land’s reservoir for carbon de-sequestration. Trees pull out the most; then shrubs, perennials, grasses…
    Also, it is very interesting (almost scary) to have satellite monitoring of (the sources for) CO2, and to see where that could take us.
    Thanks, Bret James, for the lesson! – The Troutmans

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  • susan tupper says:

    very pertinent to the reasons many of us here are embracing permaculture…where I grew up in the South Pacific, climate change was a very huge concern because the islands are feeling the effects acutely, particularly with rising sea levels and storms that just devastate the already little land masses…what really got me, was coming to California and finding organic versus non-organic (or as I like to call ‘poisoned’ foods). I thought all fresh food was organic but oh no…the travesty is that one has to pay three times as much to get non-poisoned foods and even then, these organic labels are not to be trusted! There came a point I could not bear to shop for groceries anymore cos my stomach would churn..meats colored etc…just awful!

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  • Kimberley Kinsey says:

    This lesson I find not very useful to me. Too much evolution. I agree that the earth is being abused, we definitely need to look after it and help nature restore itself.

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  • Xochitl Coronado says:

    Permaculture is definitely a solution to rising temperatures. its interesting to see how the pollutants travel across the globe. its a guide of where the permaculture movement needs to be.

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    • Bret James says:

      Valuable observation Xochitl! And also that pollution effects EVERYONE even if there isn’t a brown cloud overhead. Chances are there are micro plastics in my well water…

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  • Dorota Glab says:

    This is an incredible computer model!

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  • Kimberly Groome says:

    The supplemental material is a nice add on to the lessons, Im learning so much already

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    • Bret James says:

      There is so much to learn in permaculture that most any of these lessons or modules could be a course in their own! The intent of a PDC is to show and teach what is possible and let you pick the specific areas that you want to study and master in depth!

      Reply

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